Introduction

HITCOMP is a searchable database designed for educators, workforce developers, current and future workforce members, students, eHealth managers, staffing experts and other interested parties in healthcare information technology/eHealth. The HITCOMP Tool and Repository can be used to compile information on skills and competencies needed for a variety of healthcare roles, levels and areas of knowledge. You can sort over 1000 competencies in five domains – Direct Patient Care, Administration, Informatics, Engineering/IS/ICT and Research/Biomedicine. Competencies are associated with a particular level of skill (Baseline, Basic, Intermediate, Advanced and Expert). Competencies are also mapped to over 250 health IT-impacted roles in Acute Care in each of the five domains.

There are two types of queries you can perform within HITCOMP: role-based and competency-based. From the Competency tab, you can perform a search from our database of competencies. With a competency search you can aggregate results by domain, by level, or within 33 areas of competency. From the Roles tab, you can perform a search of eHealth impacted job roles in healthcare. You can filter and sort your search by domain, by job type and service category, and by matching competency levels. You can also display the equivalent role in five European languages (English UK, French, German, Italian and Spanish). A description of each role is given. Finally, you can export your search results from either tab to a file for your own use.

Preamble

The HITCOMP Tool and Repository is designed to complement workforce development initiatives.  Although it is a stand-alone tool that can be used by healthcare workers, students, employers, educators and eHealth industry professionals, it is not meant to replace professional career development consultation, human resource management or formal instructional design.

There are several terminology schemes that are used throughout the tool and repository that may vary based on your region, location, organization or personal experience.  We have tried to utilize terms that are applicable and synonymous both in the United States and throughout the European Union states, such as eHealth, health IT, and informatics; however, it would be impossible to include all possible variations.  Also, we have attempted to describe eHealth/health IT roles in a variety of languages used within the European Union and throughout the world; however, we regret any errors we may have made in common usage or expression.